TW Podcast 1: Native Advertising

[Post in German] Das Werbeformat Native Advertising ist das Thema unserer ersten Podcast-Ausgabe. Was ist Native Advertising? Was sind die typischen Beispiele? Was sind Vor- und Nachteile?

TW Podcast 1: Native Advertising

Ausgabe 0: Wir starten einen Podcast

Wir haben die erste Ausgabe unseres Podcasts für den 1. September versprochen und hier ist sie. Vorab in der Ausgabe 0 erklärt Igor noch mal kurz, warum wir diesen Podcast begonnen haben und weshalb wir ihn auf Deutsch machen.

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Unsere Idee für den Third Wave Podcast

Die inhaltliche Idee, mit der wir diesen Podcast beginnen, ist sich bestimmte Themen aus der aktuellen Konversation um Technologie, Digitalisierung, Kommunikation und Gesellschaft raus zu picken und sie grundlegender vorzustellen. Der Podcast ist weniger als Beitrag zur Diskussion gedacht und mehr als Unterstützung für Menschen, die verstehen wollen, worum die Diskussion geht und was für Konsequenzen die Themen für ihre Arbeit haben.

Ausgabe 1: Native Advertising

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Als erstes Thema haben wir uns Native Advertising ausgesucht. Dieses digitale Werbeformat sorgt nicht nur bei Google und Facebook für steigende Gewinnen, sondern sieht sich auch einer zunehmenden Kritik ausgesetzt. Manch einer wird den Begriff vielleicht sogar zum ersten mal durch den Beitrag von John Oliver wahrgenommen haben.

Wir schauen uns an, was Native Advertising eigentlich genau ist, was die typischen Beispiele sind und worin die Vorteile für Anbieter und Werbetreibende liegen. Dazu kommen unsere eigenen Erfahrungen auf Facebook. All das kompakt in 20 Minuten.

Feedback willkommen

Feedback zum Podcast ist uns willkommen. Typischerweise braucht ein neuer Podcast ein paar Episoden, bis man das richtige Format, die passende Technik und vieles mehr verfeinert hat. Deswegen sind gerade zu Beginn Rückmeldungen und Verbesserungstipps hilfreich.

Wir wollen ein paar Episoden abwarten, bevor wir den Podcast auf iTunes und den anderen Podcastplattformen veröffentlichen. Wer bis dahin keine Episode verpassen will kann sich unseren Newsletter abonnieren. Einen RSS-Feed reichen wir nach, sobald uns SoundCloud für das Podcast-Programm frei geschaltet hat.

Vielen Dank an Jan und Marcel für die Unterstützung.

What we read this week (22 November)

Our favorite articles of this week. Have a great weekend.

Articles of the week

  • What Screens Want
    Brilliant web essay by Frank Chimero, and not only because he features James Burke and The West Wing. I bet that this one will come up in a lot of conversations in the next months.
  • Prada Revolutionaries
    “Bright Green has become the left's version of right-wing transhumanism: an excuse to not solve today's problems, because tomorrow's technology will fix them for us.”
  • Tom Armitage » Driftwood
    “Driftwood is a talk I gave at Playark 2013. It was meant to be a talk about leftovers (the theme of the conference being ‘reclaim’), and about Hello Lamp Post. In the writing, it turned into a broader overview of my own work – on six years of projects around cities and play.”
  • Meet The ‘Assassination Market’ Creator Who’s Crowdfunding Murder With Bitcoins – Forbes
    “Assassination Market, a crowdfunding service that lets anyone anonymously contribute bitcoins towards a bounty on the head of any government official–a kind of Kickstarter for political assassinations.”
  • Ross Andersen – Humanity’s deep future
    "When we peer into the fog of the deep future what do we see – human extinction or a future among the stars?"
  • Bitcoin As Protocol | Union Square Ventures
    “There is no other widely used protocol in the world today that accomplishes this: with bitcoin anyone can make a statement (a transaction) and have this be recorded in a globally visible and fixed ledger.”
  • Content economics, part 4: scale | Felix Salmon
    "It’s almost impossible to overstate the importance of the CMS when it comes to the question of who’s going to win the online-publishing wars."
  • InMoov » Project
    "Here is “InMoov”, the first life size humanoid robot you can 3D print and animate. You have a 3D printer, some building skills, This project is for you!!"
  • Apple and Google Maps, and Defaults | Matt Mullenweg
    “If Microsoft did this a decade ago we’d call for the DoJ to reopen their investigation. Apple has the best phone, best tablet, and in many ways the best operating system — we should not give them a pass for this blatantly self-interested and user-hostile stance.”
  • Instagram and Youtube — Benedict Evans
    "WhatsApp and Instagram are not in different categories – they're direct competitors for time and attention." – This spot on.

What we read this week (17 May)

Skepticism about Big Data, the hiccups that come with replacing employees with robots, “social lasers of cruelty,” Google’s new cutting-edge toy and the bizarre story of a con man and government collaborator.

Quote of the week

Society will develop a new kind of servitude which covers the surface of society with a network of complicated rules, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate.

Alexis de Tocqueville

Articles of the week

  • Foreign Policy: Think Again: Big Data
    Kate Crawford, prinicipal researcher at Microsoft, makes the case for curbing our enthusiasm when it comes to Big Data and instead employing more caution and forethought. Most of the concerns she highlights here stem from the fact that data out of context can be misconstrued, and can therefore be a liability.
  • Caixin Online: Why Foxconn’s Switch to Robots Hasn’t Been Automatic
    Johannes’ recent talk at re:publica discussed what happens when machines replace us at work. Foxconn is an interesting example of a company in the midst of just such a transition, and demonstrates many of the social and logistic difficulties that come with the territory.
  • Smithsonian Magazine: What Turned Jaron Lanier Against the Web?
    Jaron Lanier is another voice advocating caution to the techno-utopians – a group he used to belong to. He’s especially critical of the notion of the “wisdom of the crowd”: “This is the thing that continues to scare me. You see in history the capacity of people to congeal—like social lasers of cruelty. That capacity is constant.”
  • New York Times Bits Blog: Google Buys a Quantum Computer
    The D-Wave quantum computer that was in the news a while back has been bought by Google and NASA, who are collaborating to work on AI and machine learning. Take note of the other companies and organizations mentioned in this article – it’s an interesting crew.
  • Wired Threat Level: Drugstore Cowboy
    A long read and a crazy story about a con man who cooperated with the US government to nab Google for supporting illegal drug sales through AdWords.

What we read this week (16 November)

This week we learned about Facebook losing prominent clients, how the future might not be as bad as most promise, how McKinsey is teaching it clients gathering intelligence from social media and Dustin Curtis’ take on why you should always pick the best possible product.

Quote of the week

When you fail, you want to preach to the world too – because you’re saving somebody that same mistake.

Tim O’Reilly

Articles of the week

  • readwrite: Mark Cuban is taking his money away from facebook
    Dallas Mavericks owner and private billionaire Mark Cuban is not amused. After voicing heavy discontent with facebook’s recent page-changes (asking money in order to reach your own fans) he now openly discussed relocating to Tumblr or the relaunching Myspace as main hub.
  • Forbes: Don’t worry about the future
    Authors Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler explain why we should not really be worried, no matter what the headlines are. They identify four main drivers that let you forget all the noise around you for one second.
  • McKinsey Quarterly: Intel inside
    McKinsey is starting to comprehend the use of social media besides sales promotion. In the current Quarterly they provide a framework of sorts for a different kind of social media utilisation: Gathering intelligence with live-testing, crowd intelligence and new influencers. (Free signup required)
  • AllThingsD: Google launches alternative reality Android game
    One of those few times you will wish you would have an Android device instead of that iPhone of yours.
  • Dustin Curtis: Rolling with the best
    “The fundamental problem is that many products are created to be sold, not used.” We agree.

What we read this week (16 Mar)

Our articles of the week: one man’s account of leaving Google, PayPal’s digital wallet, libraries of the future, thoughts on the New Aesthetic and some impressive customer service.

Quotes of the week

You want to have a mind that’s open enough to accept radical new ideas, but not so open that your brains fall out.

Michael Shermer

‘Customers’ are a repeating pattern of behaviour that expresses itself in people.

Faris Yakob

Articles of the week

  • James Bridle: #sxaesthetic
    Great commentary on the New Aesthetic and human collaboration with technology, resulting from a panel discussion at SXSW. With cameo appearances by the Higgs Boson, Kafka and Wikileaks.
  • TechCrunch: PayPal’s New Digital Wallet
    PayPal is looking to “let consumers do things with their money that have never been possible before.” Will these new options prove more convenient, or more problematic?
  • Undercurrent: How Bergdorf Goodman is Killing it in Digital
    Derrick Bradley recounts “one of the most pleasant digital encounters with a brand.” Bergdorf Goodman’s customer service went a couple small steps further than one would expect, making a huge difference in Derrick’s experience.
  • James Whittaker: Why I Left Google
    James Whittaker explains how “sharing” became a bee in Google’s bonnet, and how the ensuing social-oriented projects eventually led him to leave the company.
  • Rachel Coldicutt: The Joys of Having Nothing to Read
    Rachel Coldicutt of Caper gave this talk last year as part of the London Word Festival. Here she tells us why the libraries of the future shouldn’t make it too easy for us to find what we’re after: in other words, why they should “offer you sprouts when what you want is ice cream.”

What we read this week (10 Feb)

A week that prominently featured outcry over how web services handle our data, a Q&A with Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley and some thoughts on the Death of the Cyberflâneur.

The reason the Web took off is not because it was a magic idea, but because I persuaded everyone to use HTML and HTTP.

Tim Berners-Lee about the social process of trying to get everyone to use the same standards

As the room lit up with projections of Call of Duty footage, Nyan Cat animations and sample-heavy bass, I couldn’t stop thinking that this show was among the signs that “Internet culture” is now just culture.

Anthony Volodkin about a recent Skrillex show

  • RWW: Foursquare CEO Dennis Crowley on What He’s Learning From Twitter and What’s Next
    Dennis Crowley speaks about the future of Foursquare and how his service will become more mainstream.
  • The Next Web: Path’s Address Book Mistake Shows an Apple Problem Path has been caught uploading their users’ entire address books to their servers as soon as one installs their app on an iOS device. The outcry was and is big. Rightfully so. Still, there is a larger issue to be discussed here. It’s how we started accepting privacy-related questions in a way that Facebook, Apple and Google want us to see them. Time to demand from the services we use to be transparent upfront about how they intend to use our data.
  • Pinterest is quietly generating revenue by modifying user submitted pins
    Pinterest, while officially still in beta, sees tremendous growth. Now they are even started earning money, which is not objectionable. The way they chose to start monetizing is quite questionable, though: They alter user submitted links to include referral codes, thus collecting affiliate kickbacks – without making that obvious to their users.
  • NYTimes: The Death of the Cyberflâneur
    We share Evgeny Morozov’s opinion on Facebook’s “frictionless sharing.” But services like Tumblr and Twitter make us think that the cyberflâneur is alive and well.
  • Slate: How the hot ad agency fell from grace.
    “I come to bury Crispin, not to praise it.” Slate’s Seth Stevenson, never a fan of the ad-world-darling Crisipin Porter & Bogusky, rips them apart for their work on VW and Burger King, which have dropped CPB in 2010 and 2011.

What we read this week (6 Jan)

Lots of great articles this week. Read about a Somali terrorist group’s social media strategy, the internet as a human right (or not), networked science, the way copyright is broken and plenty more.

Quotes of the week

The best way to predict the future is to hang out with some of the outliers already living it. We don’t make ‘predictions,’ but instead tell stories about the people and products that are exciting us before they’ve gone mainstream.

David Rowan

Internet Access Is Not a Human Right.

Vint Cerf

Articles of the week

  • Slate: Twitter of Terror
    A Somali militant group unveils a new social media strategy for terrorists.
  • Duke University: What Could Have Entered the Public Domain on January 1, 2012?
    The copyright system is pretty badly broken. Duke University’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain shows a few of the cultural works that would have entered the Public Domain – allowing you to reproduce, remix, and share them – under the copyright law in its 1978 version. That is, before copyright was extended from 28 years after publication to last ridiculously long, namely for 70 years after the author’s death. There is a whole treasure trove of culture, locked away and in many cases inaccessible.
  • mobiThinking: Global mobile statistics 2011
    A comprehensive, massive overview of mobile stats for 2011.
  • anideo: Harmony
    Apple’s overall success is being mostly attributed to their superiority in design. While there is no argument about their excellence in this field, it is much more then just the design that leads to such success.
  • The Atlantic: To Know, but Not Understand
    The Berkman Center’s David Weinberger, internet theorist and author of seminal books like The Cluetrain Manifesto and Small Pieces Loosely Joined, tackles a new subject: Big Data, and how to deal with it. This article offers an abstract of Weinberger’s new book.
  • heise online: Sparkassen führen NFC-Payment ein
    (Article in German) It is somewhat of a surprise to see the German Sparkassen Group implement NFC chips into their normal banking cards starting 2012. Nevertheless, we are curious how both consumers and retail will react to it and how the conversation will be shaped by this announcement.
  • The Next Web: Amazon’s e-book tax loophole could mean lower European prices, but that’s bad for UK competition
    Without making much fuss, Luxembourg cut the VAT, and in effect ebook prices for consumers. Ebooks, unlike paper books, are subject to full VAT across the EU. So this could change market dynamics quite a bit: Both Amazon and Apple sell their ebooks from Luxembourg, and might now be able to undercut local book prices. Here’s the German perspective (in German).
  • New York Times: Internet Access is Not a Human Right. As an elder of information technology and Chief Internet Evangelist at Google, Vint Cerf says the internet should not be a human right. Sounds outrageous? The point Cerf makes is an excellent one, actually: It’s important not to protect the tool, but rather its empowering qualities. A must read.
  • ReadWriteWeb: Google+ Is Going To Mess Up The Internet
    Jon Mitchell, one of the regular authors at RWW, documents his frustration with Google+. An interesting read with some very well placed arguments. The problem with Google+ right now is that nobody really can figure out what Google wants it to become and as soon people stumble into new insights around it, it becomes all very overdramatized and hectic. Google needs to take charge of the communication around its favorite product. But then again, Google was never good at that.
  • brand eins: Das digitale Urheberrecht steht am Abgrund
    Brand Eins, certainly one of the best business magazines in Germany, inquires into the way copyright works – or fails to work – in a digital context. It’s a long, in-depth interview in German. Well worth reading.
  • Clay Shirky: Newspapers, Paywalls and Core Users
    Newspapers have been experimenting with paid vs free content for a number of years, sometimes more, often less successfully. Clay Shirky thinks that 2012 might be the year where newspaper economics could start working out. That is, they might work out once newspapers stop treating all news as a product and all readers as customers.
  • GigaOM: You are what you curate: Why Pinterest is hawt
    A nice overview of a trend that’s been surging for awhile now, and is still gathering steam: Online content curation. Focusing on Pinterest, GigaOM explains why curation services are so successful and why we can expect a wave of services that make curation even more streamlined and structured.
  • CNN: Digital music sales top physical sales
    Digital music purchases accounted for 50.3% of music sales in 2011. That’s a first, and proves beyond any doubt that consumers are willing to pay for online content, and that the CD won’t be missed for long. Now the big question is: Will we see music purchases rise further, or see on demand streaming take over? In other words, is it ownership or access to music that consumers are willing to pay for?
  • Forbes: The Seven Habits of Spectacularly Unsuccessful Executives
    Sydney Finkelstein, a professor of management, did intensive research on some of the biggest corporate fails in recent history (Enron, Tyco, WorldCom etc.). Some years ago, he published the 7 habits that the senior executives at these companies all had in common. Eric Jackson has revisited them for Forbes. Recommended reading for anyone in executive positions.
  • Do Designers Actually Exploit The Poor While Trying To Do Good?
    A very interesting discussion with Jan Chipchase about design research and the work of big corporations in third world countries.

What we read this week (Dec 23)

This week’s reading list features a Google tablet, Facebook as a customer service tool, stats on mobile and social media in Japa, thoughts on Amazon’s role in changing e-publishing and much more.

Ubiquitous computing is roughly the opposite of virtual reality. Where virtual reality puts people inside a computer-generated world, ubiquitous computing forces the computer to live out here in the world with people.

Mark Weiser

What we read this week (2 Dec)

Russell Davies & the post-digital, Gidsy could change things, why we are surprised about our lack of surprise about the future, a prototype worth a 1000 ideas, a retrospective on Zuck’s apologies are just a few of the things we read this week & highly recommend.

Quotes of the week

The best advice I could possibly give you, and forgive me if this seems glib, is to work. Work. Work. Work. Every day. At the same time every day. For as long as you can take it every day, work, work, work. Understand? Talent is for shit.

Barry Moser

A digital strategy is a plan to engage and empower networks of people, connected by shared interests, to satisfy a measurable business objective.

Bud Caddell

Articles of the week

What we read this week (18 Nov)

While we retreat for a few days of strategic planning, brainstorming and relaxation, we have a long list of fantastic reading material for you. Enjoy!