What we read this week (22 November)

Our favorite articles of this week. Have a great weekend.

Articles of the week

  • What Screens Want
    Brilliant web essay by Frank Chimero, and not only because he features James Burke and The West Wing. I bet that this one will come up in a lot of conversations in the next months.
  • Prada Revolutionaries
    “Bright Green has become the left's version of right-wing transhumanism: an excuse to not solve today's problems, because tomorrow's technology will fix them for us.”
  • Tom Armitage » Driftwood
    “Driftwood is a talk I gave at Playark 2013. It was meant to be a talk about leftovers (the theme of the conference being ‘reclaim’), and about Hello Lamp Post. In the writing, it turned into a broader overview of my own work – on six years of projects around cities and play.”
  • Meet The ‘Assassination Market’ Creator Who’s Crowdfunding Murder With Bitcoins – Forbes
    “Assassination Market, a crowdfunding service that lets anyone anonymously contribute bitcoins towards a bounty on the head of any government official–a kind of Kickstarter for political assassinations.”
  • Ross Andersen – Humanity’s deep future
    "When we peer into the fog of the deep future what do we see – human extinction or a future among the stars?"
  • Bitcoin As Protocol | Union Square Ventures
    “There is no other widely used protocol in the world today that accomplishes this: with bitcoin anyone can make a statement (a transaction) and have this be recorded in a globally visible and fixed ledger.”
  • Content economics, part 4: scale | Felix Salmon
    "It’s almost impossible to overstate the importance of the CMS when it comes to the question of who’s going to win the online-publishing wars."
  • InMoov » Project
    "Here is “InMoov”, the first life size humanoid robot you can 3D print and animate. You have a 3D printer, some building skills, This project is for you!!"
  • Apple and Google Maps, and Defaults | Matt Mullenweg
    “If Microsoft did this a decade ago we’d call for the DoJ to reopen their investigation. Apple has the best phone, best tablet, and in many ways the best operating system — we should not give them a pass for this blatantly self-interested and user-hostile stance.”
  • Instagram and Youtube — Benedict Evans
    "WhatsApp and Instagram are not in different categories – they're direct competitors for time and attention." – This spot on.

What we read this week (25 May)

Our reads this week: whether Facebook can be successful in the long term, how the mobile internet affects our approach to healthcare, what companies should focus on when recruiting, a new community for maker-minded kids, and insights on businesses operating at the intersection between technology and culture.

Quote of the week

The Singularity has always sounded to me like a secular version of the Rapture. It seems to fit very neatly into that same God-shaped hole.

William Gibson

Articles of the week

  • Bud Caddell: Emerging Bets at the Intersection of Technology & Culture
    Bud Caddell from Deutsch LA took his team of innovation strategists to SXSW this year to study all the startups launching there. They aggregated all their insights and put them into this report. It’s a great overview about current trends in the US startup world and what marketers can learn from them.
  • Fred Wilson: Culture and Fit
    Fred Wilson, head of Union Square Ventures, discusses some common mistakes made in companies’ hiring processes, and where the focus should really lie: culture and fit should be prized above talent and renown.
  • Technology Review: The Facebook Fallacy
    Michael Wolff explains how Facebook is not only on course to go bust, but will take the rest of the ad-supported Web with it. A controversial and compelling case on the state of affairs of ad-based online business, and why current methods cannot be successful in the long run.
  • O’Reilly Radar: Parsing a new Pew report: 3 ways the Internet is shaping healthcare
    Pew Internet and Life Project recently coducted a survey on how people inform themselves about health. Alex Howard breaks down the study’s findings into three key trends: Quantified Self, participatory medicine and what he calls the ‘new digital divide.’ Mobile health data, it seems, is particularly helpful, but in the hands of people who aren’t as likely to need it. The article prompts some interesting questions about how we could make this kind of information more accessible.
  • New York Times: Disruptions: A Beacon to Silicon Valley, From a Start-Up for Children
    Since our conversation with Zach last November, we have been eagerly awaiting the public appearance of his new venture. DIY is here and it is shaping up to be an interesting community for kids who make things. The kids post pictures of their work online, and can find inspiration in users’ projects, from melted crayon paintings to soda bottle rockets. It’s nice to see the Internet evolving in a way that appeals to a different age group.