TW Reads – A Future of News edition

Five articles about the Future of News and why it needs a merging of journalism and technology.

“To be successful, digital publications must do more than permit a story to come together — they must also empower the kind of prolific, creative collaboration required to bring off stories that can seduce even the most distracted readers.”

Editorially

As Igor mentioned in his work note, we quite enjoy observing the news media industry at the moment. When the NY Times Innovation Report was released, we – once again – noticed the undercurrent of a theme we’ve been running with for some time now: in the future every company will also be a tech company. Or in this case: every journalism company will also be a tech company.

The merging of literature and technology is also true for journalism and technology. And it’s not only about how to get your content to your audience but also about infrastructure is changing consumption and thus creation.

We see the strongest potential for future success with approaches that show a joint passion for reporting, production, delivery and communication.

Here are some articles and links from the last few weeks on that topic:

  • The Atlantic: Method Journalism
    
Alexis Madrigal analyzes how this round of new media sites like Vox, FiveThirtyEight and others are no longer about an “area of coverage” but a “method of coverage.”
  • NY Times: Scoop – A Glimpse Into the NYTimes CMS
    In times when some in Germany think that 10 percent of a new media endeavor’s budget for tech is too much, this is an interesting look at the new, digital-first CMS that the NY Times is building. It’s a little more than just setting up a WordPress instance.
  • Editorially joins Vox Media
    
Besides being glad that the smart people behind failed startup Editorially having found a new home, this announcement is actually full of interesting insights. The Editorially team will help Vox Media to optimize the editorial workflow (see the quote above).
  • Forbes: The Invention Of News: How The World Came To Know About Itself
    In the heated debates about the future of news, we tend to forget about the history of news and what we can learn from that. Andrew Pettegree has written the go-to book about it and this interview makes us want to buy it.
  • BuzzFeed’s Jonah Peretti Goes Long
    
When even people like Seth Godin think that BuzzFeed is about cats and listicles, we’d recommend looking a bit deeper. And this (very) long interview with its founder Jonah Peretti is an excellent place to start. Trust us on this one.

Author: Johannes

Johannes is a strategist and consultant for digital communications. His work is informed by his experience of working with brands like Deutsche Telekom, MTV, Postbank, Maggi and Nike and by his insatiable appetite for finding the bigger patterns behind current developments in technology and science. Holding a diploma in Media System Design, Johannes is a regular speaker at web and marketing conferences like Republica and the Social Media Summit.